British Museum

Another wet weekend forecast, with grey clouds and rain, so off down to ‘that London’ for a trip to the British Museum. Lady Hughes and myself had never been to the British Museum, so this promised to be interesting.

Looking at the website, we saw that it was walking distance from Euston Station, free, and the average visit lasted 2.5 hours – all I can say about that last one, is the average person can’t be looking at half of the stuff or they’re constantly being visited by runners trying to beat their personal bests for getting around as quickly as possible.

I didn’t actually know much about the British Museum, obviously, I knew it had a lot of antiquities and priceless artefacts – at what point do things become artefacts by the way? My house is full of ‘stuff’ but I wouldn’t describe anything as an ‘artefact’ as such. I don’t complain that people aren’t putting their artefacts away, or I’m sick of tripping over artefacts left lying around on the floor. Maybe it has to be in a museum first? Maybe museums have artefacts and I just have stuff.

Anyway, I didn’t know a lot about the British Museum.

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We entered through the North entrance, which meant we missed walking through the main entrance into the Great Court which was renovated for the millennium with a beautiful sweeping roof making the courtyard into a stunning indoor space. So when we stumbled into it, it was a wonderful surprise.

The exhibits themselves were impressive and extensive, with highlights including; the Elgin Marbles, The Sutton Hoo collection, the Lewis Chess Set (finest chess set in the world, apparently), the Rosetta Stone, the Rothschild collection, the Egyptian collection, Roman collection and the Assyrian collection – if you don’t know what any of those are either google them, or visit for yourself, I can’t do them justice here.

Needless to say, some of the exhibits were amazing, especially when you consider how old they are. In fact, we were able to handle a flint hand axe that was 500’000 years old. Which is pretty impressive in itself, until we were told that it wasn’t made by a human but by a species of early man now extinct – get your head around that.

Yes, lots to see, and it was pretty busy, so lots of people too. I saw one woman literally give up and tell her friend, “I’m sorry, but I just can’t do this anymore”. Her friend seemed to understand and helped her to the exit. Like all museums, you’re walking around looking at stuff, sorry, artefacts. And even the most enthusiastic and interested get a bit weary after a while, so we did skim a few sections – there are only so many Greek vases I can look at and still summon up the interest to read the description.

The map, offers some ‘not to be missed’ suggestions and we focused on them in the end to give us a bit of a focus. This worked a treat as it meant we saw most of the museum anyway, even if parts were a little cursory.

So, in summary, if you like a good museum I certainly recommend this one – it’s a cracker. But wear comfortable shoes and maybe check out the website to see what you definitely don’t want to miss. Also, I’m not sure I’d bring small children, unless you’re confident they’d really be up for it.

Chris